Recommended Great Books For Aspiring Womanizers

Michael Blowhard once challenged CH and readers to look at what the great writers in the Western literary tradition had to say about courtship. Many responded.

Alas, it is not God’s plenty. A man who relies on literature for his models can easily get swept away by the glorious pedestalizing.

Ovid’s seduction manual, The Art of Love, is pretty uneven in its advice. Stendhal’s On Love is pretty good. Castiglione’s Book of the Courtier is a good manual for how to be an overall attractive man. (Both were used to good effect by Robert Greene in The Art of Seduction.) Moliere shows what not to do in The Misanthrope, as does Flaubert in Madame Bovary. Byron has some scattered good thoughts. Burke, from a more traditionalist perspective, has some profound thoughts on masculinity and femininity. I’ve never read Casanova’s memoirs so I cannot tell you how good they are as literature or as pickup advice. I haven’t read Laclos’ Dangerous Liasons either. It’s been a long, long time since I read Richardson’s Clarissa, with its famous seducer Lovelace. Freud expounds nicely on female narcissism.

I’d also throw in How to be the Jerk Women Love by F.J. Shark (truly a great classic in the annals of lit-ra-choor), Nine and a Half Weeks by Elizabeth McNeill, and Story of O by Pauline Reage. Even pulp romance novels, however hackish, can be helpful to your learned pursuit of utterly dominating a woman’s will and heart. As with the last two book recommendations, female authors will invariably reveal their pulsing erotic ids through their characters. The trick to reading romantic literature written by a woman is to pay attention to what TURNS ON the female character. Not what the character claims to want in a hypothetical boyfriend or husband, but what she specifically describes that got her tingling like a Van de Graaff generator. Editorial commentary can be ignored, because the prerequisite for becoming any woman’s ideal lover is to first become her actual lover.





Comments


  1. on September 4, 2013 at 10:29 am Stg58/Animal Mother

    You can also try reading the owner’s manual for women: The Bible. Lots of game in that book. Women loving killers, descriptions of men women want, etc. 2 Samuel reads like a mafia novel.

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    • on September 4, 2013 at 11:40 am stevie tellatruth

      Ya know, the Calvinist theologian Matt Slick wrote a little ditty while in seminary called “How to Woo and Win Women by Being an Obnoxious Jerk”. He meant it for fun but there’s a lot of game principles in it.

      His website has since locked access to it(shame!) but you get can the gist of what track he’s on from the TOC:

      TABLE OF CONTENTS

      1. Regarding the Wooing of Women
      2. The Jerk Quotient
      3. Making a Good Impression?
      4. What does a Woman Want? A Real Man
      5. Girl Logic
      6. The Proper Use of Confusion
      7. What Not to Say to a Woman
      8. Being a Sensitive Man
      9. How to be interesting
      10. Using your face
      11. Live to Dress or Dress to Live
      12. You and Female Hormones
      13. The Mothering Instinct
      14. Conversation? What’s That?
      15. Last Things

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    • on September 5, 2013 at 2:15 pm Hugh G. Rection

      Not a very entertaining read though the way it is written.

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    • I recently read a few chapters of The Bible (I’m an atheist) and I’ll 2nd this recommendation.

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  2. No “Mode One” or “Oooooh . . . Say it Again”??? My ego is hurt.

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    • I think the omission of all the recent crop of PUA material is deliberate- the list is about literature, not how-to manuals.

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      • Well, my books are by no means literature … so I will give you that. But on the flip side, I have *NEVER* considered myself a “pick up artist” / PUA. My books are primarily about improving interpersonal communication skills … not about “gimmicks” and “scripts” to use with women. So, I do not think of my books in the category of “PUA material.”

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      • “My books are primarily about improving interpersonal communication skills … not about “gimmicks” and “scripts” to use with women”

        lol brb wearing my fuzzy hat out tonight cause its still 2004 apparently.

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      • One question:

        ‘Who lies more? Men or Women?”

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  3. Most aspects of game, if not all, are covered by Rosalind’s advice while disguised as Ganymede in Shakespeare’s ‘As You Like It.’ See also ‘Twelfth Night’ and ‘Much Ado About Nothing.’ In case drawings are necessary, see René Girard’s ‘A Theater of Envy.’

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  4. Mickey Sabbath, the protagonist of Philip Roth’s “Sabbath’s Theater,” is the boldest of characters, nature’s animating life-force distilled in a depiction of dying, but still savage and raw male sexuality. The book is Roth’s best, and is among my very favorite novels. Highly recommended.

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  5. … Would you say these are… Great Books for Men?

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  6. Nine and a Half Weeks by Elizabeth McNeill, and Story of O by Pauline Reage

    Along these lines, Never the Face is good too.

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  7. You forgot “50 Shades of Gray”. Oh wait…. it was “Great” books. Knockoff mommy porn need not apply. Though the dynamic there is pretty clear.

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  8. I suppose “Gone with the Wind” counts – it was a book first, and the difference between Scarlett O’Hara’s attraction to Rhett Butler (alpha, asshole) vs. Ashley Wilkes (beta) is clear enough.

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    • “Marjorie Morningstar” by Herman Wouk was written specifically to learn how the hamster works, so he could create realistic female characters in his later books.

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      • Yes. I couldn’t believe a man wrote that book, it was so accurate. Although he couldn’t resist the fairy tale ending– the girl rejecting the alpha instead of the other way around.

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      • His next book (Youngblood Hawke) was a fictionalized autobiography. In it, he says his sister had her own Noel Airman, and the book came partly from her story. She also had her happy ending with a beta provider, but he implies she was lucky to do so. His fictional counterpart, Hawke, writes the same book (Evelyn Biggers) but gives her an unhappy ending; the book is a flop.

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      • Are you nuts? It’s a 550 page book. No thanks.

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    • Spot on.

      That was my first alpha/beta lesson as a girl. That’s when I first discovered what I wanted.

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    • It has everything in it. I noticed the white knighting soldiers on both sides of the war.

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  9. How about Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew? Specifically, the Burton/Taylor film adaptation.

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  10. It’s too archaic for a general audience, but Juvenal’s sixth Satire stiffens the sinews and summons the blood to identify timeless truths.

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  11. If you can French, read “Manon Lescaut”.

    -As a cautionary tale of everything not to do.

    Especially pedestalizing a Bernankified slut and thinking she can be saved, from herself; especially by Love.

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  12. The Unbearable Lightness of Being
    Tom Jones
    Much Ado About Nothing
    The Sun Also Rises

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  13. “My Secret Garden” and it’s sequel “Forbidden Flowers” by Nancy Friday. You don’t really understand female sexuality if you haven’t read these. And yes, your mom, your sister, and your Madonna one-itis have had similar fantasies.

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  14. on September 4, 2013 at 11:51 am Stg58/Animal Mother

    Peter Pan the Disney movie is chock full of game. I know, because I have watched it about 500 times by now.

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  15. I see no mention of Jesus, Moses, or Homer in these books about courtship which is where every aspiring womanizer should look first to get the power to induce gina tingles and butthexings..lolzlolzlolz

    Or something like that.

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  16. on September 4, 2013 at 1:16 pm lagunabeachfogey

    I would add ‘The Girls’ by Henry de Montherlant.

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  17. Juvenal’s Sixth Satire.

    … I am aware
    of whatever councils you old friends warn,
    i.e. “throw the bolt and lock her in.” But who is going to guard the
    guards themselves, who now keep silent the lapses of the loose
    girl – paid off in the same coin? The common crime keeps its silence.
    A prudent wife looks ahead and starts (her infidelities) with them.

    Are you even in this day and age preparing both a prenup
    and an engagement, and getting a trim from a master
    barber, and you have even perchance given the pledge to her finger?
    You certainly used to be healthy. Postumus, are you getting married?
    Tell me by what Fury and by what vipers you are goaded.
    Can you endure any Master-ess when there are so many good strong ropes,
    When high, vertiginous windows are wide open,
    when the Aemilian bridge offers itself to you – just right next door?
    Or if from so many options no mode of death strikes your fancy,
    Surely you think it better that a supple boy sleep with you?
    A boy, who does not conduct a nocturnal lawsuit at you, who wheedles
    no little gifts from you as he lies there, and neither complains because
    you are going easy on him, nor because you don’t gasp as much as he demands.

    lines 6.60-81 – Marry a woman and an actor will become a father instead of you.
    lines 6.82-113 – Eppia, a senator’s wife, ran off to Egypt with a gladiator. (alpha dude)
    lines 6.114-141 – Messalina, wife of Claudius, sneaked out of the palace to work at a brothel.
    lines 6.142-160 – Men love a pretty face, not the woman. When she gets old, they kick her out. Fuck yeah!

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  18. Henry James’ The Bostonians is literally about the seduction of a feminist, how has that not been mentioned?

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  19. The Diaries of William Byrd are pretty hilarious as he rogures his way through 18th century Tidewater gentry, though not sure they would provide any helpful tips tips for aspiring womanizers.

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  20. Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, by Lord Byron. Hell, even a biography of Byron would do. He was described by one of his many conquests as “mad, bad, and dangerous to know,” which is a pretty good description of alpha.

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    • on September 6, 2013 at 5:21 am The Burninator

      Quite so, Byron was quite the rogue in his day. You can tell that immediately by how academia is trying to castrate and effeminize him so much over the last decade. I reality though he was a hell of a man, not just in love, but also a warrior to boot.

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  21. Dosoyevsky’s Notes From Underground. This book has the best neg in recorded literature.

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  22. I just finished reading “Turn, Magic Wheel” by Dawn Powell and it has a good portrayal of an alpha male in the form of a novelist called Andrew Callingham who goes through multiple relationships with women. It shows how he sees women and how they see him.

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  23. 9 1/2 Weeks was a great film completely misunderstood by feminists at the time and dissed as sexist and masochistic.

    But watch the opening and how the Mickey Rourke character totally games “Elizabeth”: push-pull, aloof, compliance testing like when he brings her to his houseboat then then starts making the bed. When she says he’s taking some liberties he starts to scare her by escalating sexually.

    When he finally bangs her the first time—about date 4 she is totally obsessed with him.

    That line: “I saw myself in you” pure gold….

    Great movie from a game perspective.

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  24. The problem with relying on literature for advice is that it has always been consumed mainly by women. The first novels in China and Japan were romance novels for women (Tale of Genji, Dream of the Red Chamber), and the Victorian novels repeated the pattern. To see what women really want through literature you need to be able to read and comprehend women’s thoughts, which doesn’t come naturally to men.

    For most men this is a waste of time. They will never get it, and thank God for that! If all men devoted themselves to “understanding” women there would be no other accomplishments to speak of.

    Just teach men to view society in a hierarchical manner, with women beneath them as their charges, and it will serve them far better than any amount of study of female psychology.

    Come to think of it, that’s what the Bible, the Koran, the Analects and the Bhagavad Gita all do. This is the kind of literature men should read — the classics. Leave novels and “high culture” to the rare men who have the ability to read between the lines.

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    • on September 5, 2013 at 2:32 pm Hugh G. Rection

      Good point. Just compare a man’s book shelves with a woman’s (these days it’s a plus if she has one though).

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    • on September 6, 2013 at 5:27 am The Burninator

      I don’t see many women enjoying Heart of Darkness, nor anything by Dostoyevsky. Nor Poe. In fact, men did at one time consume copious amounts of literature. Where do you get your reading demographics through the ages to make such a claim? The only time I believe your observations to be true would be from the late 19th century forward, and even then men were well read as a matter of course at least through the 1960’s.

      Beowulf wasn’t written for chicks, dude.

      Speaking of which, Beowulf, for examples of how men should act. Supreme alpha.

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      • on September 6, 2013 at 11:52 am alexandrahamilton87

        Speak for yourself, Heart of Darkness is in my top 3. Hard to believe English was not Conrad’s native tongue.

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      • The key word, dear, was “many”. Attention to detail please.

        I do agree on the note regarding language. He shows no real tell tale syntax structure mistakes that I’d expect to see slip occasionally from a native Polish speaker. Fantastic mind and achiever.

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      • on September 6, 2013 at 5:40 pm alexandrahamilton87

        I was being just a little tongue-in-cheek. 🙂

        Yeah, I don’t either and my parents are Polish and only learned English in their late 30’s, so I’m very familiar with the common syntax mistakes. Conrad’s command of English was amazing.

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      • Polacks sticking together! Pride of Pole, I love it.

        Yes, Conrad was a genius.

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  25. I think that the Marquis de Sade deserves a shout out.

    “The only way to a woman’s heart is along the path of torment.”
    ― Marquis de Sade

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  26. You forgot Eat, Prey, Love

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  27. I consider Casanova’s autobiography to be the greatest piece of literature I’ve come across. If you’re just looking for some straight forward pick up advice, it’s not the book for you. To appreciate the pick-up related value of his memoirs, you need to look deeper into the text and analyse his personal characteristics to understand why he was so successful with women, (his name, after all, is practically synonymous with womanizing now.)

    But there’s more to Casanova than just the fact that his affairs with women numbered in the triple digits during the 18th century; he was a genuinely extraordinary man. He spent every minute of his life plotting and scheming and finding a new way of getting what he wanted, and he had no regard for societal expectations. He fucked nuns and the wives of powerful men and even took the virginity of a woman the night before her wedding to another man (Casanova did it because considered the man to be unworthy of her and didn’t want him to have her as a virgin.) And he constantly got away with these things throughout his life.

    When he was finally put into prison he was given an intederminate sentence without a trial. He was put up in a high-security prison called the Leads which the locals all feared because the people that ended up there were never seen again and no one had ever escaped.

    Typically, Casanova found a way out through the roof of the 6 story building and somehow managed to get down to the ground and escape to France. The story of his prison break became famous throughout Europe and he became something of a celebrity. Alexandre Dumas later wrote his famous novel, The Count of Monte Christo, in which the prison break is largely based around Casanova’s real life escape.

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  28. The Lucifer Principle: A Scientific Expedition into the Forces of History by Howard Bloom.

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  29. on September 4, 2013 at 11:23 pm Third Beta from the Sun

    Oscar Wilde. Don’t deny it.

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    • on September 6, 2013 at 5:30 am The Burninator

      Not so much actually. His writing is quite effeminate, even if you don’t know he was gay. He was talented and charismatic to be sure, but you can practically hear the lisp in his writings.

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  30. Schopenhauer’s essays on women, love, art, men and society and moral are pretty accurate on their description, a tad romanticized and with curly language, but the message is clear and to the point

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  31. Arthur Schopenhauer’s essay “On Women.” I always thought that it was a basic piece everybody read for game. I control+F’d his name and he didn’t come up.

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  32. Every book written/movie made before 1960 is “recommended” insofar as it tells of the time before feminism corrupted both sexes. The generations we were born into will be a footnote in history. We are the anomaly.

    “Wait, you mean women wanted to be men at the end of the 20th century, and men went along with it?”

    Read history, fellows. It is the only way to put our fucked-up era in perspective. It was not always thus, it will not ever be thus.

    Matt

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    • @Matt. – much respect, first.

      Odd story. I gather that you may not be a fan of Ayn Rand, that’s fine, but she had an interesting turn of a phrase when asked if she was the last of the capitalists. “No, I’m the first of their return”. I relate this to put the event from this last Wednesday in context.

      I make holsters, motorcycle equipment, horse tack, etc., I also have raised draft horses, and am usually found wearing a Stetson, including at the biker rallies I attend with my custom leather biker gear, belt, open carried Blackhawk and so on. Most folks who know me call me simply Cowboy, even the ones who have known me for years. I’m 6’3″, broad shoulders, huge arms/chest, great shape, etc. Had two HB 8/8.5 approach with big dreamy looking dopey eyes staring at me next to my motorcycle, one said “Oh my, we found the last man on earth!” And I replied “Nope, I’m the first of their return”. They liked it. (“That would be amazing!”, “I wish!” gush…tingle).

      Point being, I’ve had a similar view as you, that this age is unnatural and insustainable. Even the women can’t stand it, and many are becoming vocal in defying The Sisterhood about it. Throw a traditional unapologetic, unbowed masculine man in front of them and the teachings of The Cathedral go right out the window like cig butts out of a 1970’s car.

      Yeah, I ramble.

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      • Ayn Rand has her uses. She is an excellent contrarian for teenagers who have been forced to choke on the life-hating sputum vomited directly into their mouths from our child-indoctrination centers K-12. I credit her for awakening me from my dogmatic slumber at an early age.

        The problem is, once liberated, you see how poorly her Atheist-Russian-Female-Jèw philosophies have been thought out.

        She inspires by dint of her comic book portraits, by superheroes that cannot exist in the world. They are a good punch in the jaw, like every boy requires to become a man. Her one-liners are eternally appropriate, as you have discovered, if inadequate to the completion of the mission she urged us to take up as young men.

        Brother, we have to find a way to make real-life bonds among men of our sturdy, no-bullshit nature. This internet thing is nice with regard to making quick connections — maybe even indispensable, like Ayn Rand almost is — but its superficiality is contrary to our purpose. Glad to make your acquaintance.

        Matt

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  33. I’ve read some of Cassanova, the real ones. He had the the classy world game/playful adventurer angle.

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  34. Jesus Christ, does nobody read actual books anymore, instead of novelty entertainment?

    For the best masculine insight into female psychology and an extended poetic treatise on the primacy of sexuality in human nature, look no further than DH Lawrence. The man could write, and he knew the importance of maintaining hand. If I remember correctly, he even made off with his professor’s wife.

    The Rainbow, Women in Love and Lady Chatterley’s Lover represent pretty much the trifecta of phallocentric literature, written in the crucial period alluded to by Matthew King, when industrialism, Darwinism and Freud had just begun to lift the veil on Victorian notions of “civilized” society and behavior.

    But what’s the point in recommending something that would take effort on a PUA site?

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    • The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand. The hero basically rough sexes the heroine, almost rape really, and she swoons over it. The hero is maximum Alpha/dominant. Written by a woman who was never shy about wanting men to stop being wimps.

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      • on September 6, 2013 at 7:14 pm alexandrahamilton87

        What’s funny is that Ayn Rand’s books first became popular in America with housewives in the late 50’s who loved the sex scenes, sort of like 50 Shades of Grey now.

        Not that there isn’t more actual substance to Ayn’s books, of course. But they were first popularized as bodice-rippers.

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      • And after the movie version was filmed, Gary Cooper (47) began boning Patricia Neal (22).

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  35. On being aloof: Camus: L’étranger (The Stranger).
    Don’t egg me boys: I still like The Game by Neil Strauss. Not for the techniques but for the awakening it gave me when I read it.

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  36. Another entry. The Witch by Anton Chekov. Beautiful painting of the soul of women, if such could be alluded to as beautiful. In fact, a lot of Chekov is fantastic.

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  37. From F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Notebooks, on his college days when he was a bit of a skirt chaser.

    “I didn’t have the two top things — great animal magnetism [e.g. natural alpha] or money. I had the two second things, tho’, good looks and intelligence. So I always got the top girl.”

    In other words, a smart striver who was able to game (intelligence) his way with women to beat out the rich guys. He was a noted exhibitionist who would act out (play the asshole) and gained female attention by it. He would act more drunk than he really was, for instance. One of his go-to opening lines with a woman was “Please fall in love with me.”

    A bit beta, perhaps, for these days, but this was circa 1914 when the society girls weren’t sluts and you had to get past the father to have any shot at them.

    Another interesting point was his competitiveness. His “ideal” girl was beautiful, rich, socially secure (status marking); but also, she was pursued. He wanted the girl to have multiple suitors, because beating them out was half the fun and made it more worthwhile.

    As a side note, after disastrously failing out of Princeton, years later Fitzgerald described his first visit to a hooker thusly:

    “It seemed on one March afternoon that I had lost every thing thing I wanted — and that night was the first time that I hunted down the spectre of womanhood that, for a little while, makes everything else seem unimportant.”

    The spectre of womanhood.

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  38. Great posting and comments-thread. Many thanks for the link to me and my current blog too — we can use a few readers.

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  39. Want to reiterate what jacquesfelixdouglas said.

    No man can consider himself an educated seducer until he has read The Memoirs of Jacques Casanova de Seingalt. This series is a gold mine for more than just seduction.

    The book series is available for download from the Gutenberg site:

    http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/2981 , or

    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2981/2981-h/2981-h.htm

    As an aside, note that the various Don Juan books are fictional works based on a character who became an archetype, similar to Arthur or Lancelot, used by various writers for their own purposes, none of which contain much of any use for real-world seduction.

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  40. […] (and commenters) recommend some great books for aspiring […]

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  41. “How to Be the Jerk Women Love” was also an episode of the original 90210:

    “Steve decides to market his pick-up techniques with a seminar class to show some guys how to pick up girls at the After Dark club. Meanwhile, Kelly balks at the request of sleeping with Matt, and later regrets it.”
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0522831/

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  42. Although Philip Wylie is pretty much forgotten now, he did write a popular diatribe about American women in the 1940s that still rings true today:

    http://www.library.csi.cuny.edu/dept/history/lavender/momism.html

    The style is very reminscent of our own blogger himself. Was Wylie an unacknowledged influence?

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